Sharp’s furniture says support local businesses

Garrett Estrada Photo Sharp’s Home Furnishings sells a variety of Ashley furniture and Whirlpool appliances with free delivery, installation and removal of old furniture to local addresses and McGill.

Garrett Estrada Photo
Sharp’s Home Furnishings sells a variety of Ashley furniture and Whirlpool appliances with free delivery, installation and removal of old furniture to local addresses and McGill.

Deborah Sharp opened Sharp’s Home Furnishings with her husband Frank in Ely back in 1998. Since then, she said the two have been on a “roller coaster ride” to try and stay afloat in the ever changing market and economy for affordable furniture and appliances. Sharp cited that advances in online ordering, increasing tendency to buy items out of town and even increased competition within the city have made things difficult for the small business owners.

So what has kept them in business for over 15 years?

“Customer service has been the thing that has pulled us through the tough times,” Sharp said. “We always want to treat our customers the way we would like to be treated.”

Customers service and low prices have been the motto of the couple ever since Frank Sharp decided to branch away from his dad’s furniture store in Wendover nearly two decades ago. It’s a philosophy that should seem like a given, but in the world of bigger and bigger online retailers, a little human contact can go a long way.

Like most locally owned family businesses, the Sharp’s get a little help from family of their own. Deborah’s son Mitchell Sharp helps his father take delivery’s all over town, another staple of the Sharp’s business model.

“We offer free delivery service to anywhere in Ely and McGill,” Sharp said. “We also go out of town down to Baker and such, but we do have to charge for that.”

The word “local” means more and more to Deborah these days, as she finds it despairing that more and more people look to save a “buck or two” and spend their money online or out of town.

“Online stores might be able to undercut our prices by a little bit, but I always tell people that it is better to spend that dollar locally and support your community,” she said. “In the end, it will go farther, otherwise you’ll end up with a ghost town.”

 

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Comments

  1. Stephen Porter says:

    Adapt or close. Those are your options.

    Of course people are going to buy on line. It is the times we live in.

    Amazon offers free delivery to! They also have an option for getting local buisness to set up the furniture if you need that.

    This store owner is using guilt as a tactic to get customers in the door. That is lazy. There is no reason why Sharps furniture couldnt use an online forum to sell their furniture. The store could become bigger and the online forum could provide even more jobs and industry to a town like Ely. Its all about ambition!

    And shame on you Mr Estrada for presenting what is esentially an ad for sharps as a news story.

    Back in 1999 my parents bought furniture from sharps. They paid $1500 for a dinner table and chairs. Two months later they found they same table at another store in Vegas for $700.

    The thing that will make Ely a ghost town is lack of vision and ambition not guilting people into overpriced items.

  2. Janet Cook says:

    When I moved back to Ely in 1995 I was there when Sharps opened. I bought quite a bit of furniture there. They were very nice to work with. They even opened their catalog to me to see if I wanted something else. That’s why I like small town business.

  3. Donna J Browning says:

    Las Vegas is 250 miles away after you send gas money and time, Small company cannot compete with the Internet free shipping, they need to pay bills. We have brought from Sharp’s anytimes and are very pleased.

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