Class project winner was the flag of the United States constructed of bottle caps, created by Boy Scout Troop 68.

Adult first place went to Paul Holdaway for a rose constructed from scrap metal.

The Ely Times

The annual Recycled Art Contest was a huge success this year, with so many creative entries, it made it very difficult to select the ultimate winners.

Many eclectic creations have been on display at the White Pine Public Museum at 2000 Aultman St. since the beginning of April.

The contest only allowed recyclable matter such as tires, electronics, plastics, cardboard, tin/aluminum, cans, newspaper, etc. however fastening materials such as tape, glue, string, etc. were used as well.

Judging took place last weekend, but you can still catch the art at the museum until the end of the month.  Many of the contestants used a variety of metals, to paper towel rolls, scrap metal to bottle caps.

The class project winner was the flag of the United States constructed of bottle caps, created by Boy Scout Troop 68. The first place winners from the White Pine High School are  Jaycee Tate and Tatum Gorecki.  They created the Sponge Bob character with cardboard, sponges, golf balls and straws.

Second place went to Tiana Kelsey which was title Trees, made with mirror, toilet paper rolls, drift wood, rope, broken branches.

Adult first place went to Paul Holdaway for a rose constructed from scrap metal. Second place adult winner went to Janet Van Camp that was Cat Tails made from clothes hangers, barb wire,  slick wire, and what was left of a bad of cement.

First place winner for sixth through eighth grade went to  was a project called “Mr. Shiney,” made by Shelby Cox from assorted cans, bottle caps and paper towels.  Second place went to  the project called Spam Kids made by Taylor and Ethan Drake, Kylie and Steven Wheeler. Prize was $20. Made from Spam Cans, card boards and the Mayor’s Choice was a recycled art piece called Reflections made by Katherine Griffith.

When you think about these projects you begin to wonder how many of these items are at the landfill instead of the recycling center?  Statistics report that people in the United States throw away $11.4 billion worth of recyclable containers and packaging every year.  And, although 75 percent of America’s waste is recyclable, we only recycle around 30 percent of it.

A single recycled plastic bottle saves enough energy to run a 100-watt bulb for 4 hours. It also creates 20 percent less air pollution and 50 percent less water pollution that would be created when making a new bottle.

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