The Ely Times http://www.elynews.com News for Ely, Nevada Mon, 15 Sep 2014 23:39:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 At Reid’s energy summit, no heretics or blasphemy allowed http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/reids-energy-summit-heretics-blasphemy-allowed/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/reids-energy-summit-heretics-blasphemy-allowed/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:00:47 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5642 At this past week’s Brother Harry’s seventh-annual Traveling Planet Salvation Show with all-day preaching and frequent amens from the choir — Can I get a witness, Brother? — presumptive presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton had the faithful standing in the pews with her hellfire and brimstone prognostications. OK, the sign on the wall behind Clinton […]

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At this past week’s Brother Harry’s seventh-annual Traveling Planet Salvation Show with all-day preaching and frequent amens from the choir — Can I get a witness, Brother? — presumptive presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton had the faithful standing in the pews with her hellfire and brimstone prognostications.

OK, the sign on the wall behind Clinton said it was the National Clean Energy Summit 7.0, which is put on by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada’s senior senator, but the rhetoric on global warming was overheated, to say the least.

“This is the most consequential, urgent, sweeping collection of challenges we face as a nation and a world,” Clinton recited from the Teleprompter. “You shouldn’t have to say the obvious, that the data is unforgiving, no matter what the deniers try to assert. Sea levels are rising. Ice caps are melting. Storms, droughts and wildfires are wreaking havoc. Thirteen of the top 14 warmest years have all come since 2000. … The threat is real.”

There you have it. The fact that the planet’s average temperature might rise 1 degree Celsius over the next century is more consequential and more urgent to address with your money than Islamic terrorists, ISIS, Putin, Iran, North Korea or the Ebola virus. It is more pressing than the fact the current economic recovery is the slowest since World War II. It is more of a threat to you and yours than the fact that the national debt has increased by $61,000 per household under the Obama administration, while household private sector income has fallen $2,000 a year.

The inconvenient truth is that ice caps have grown in the past two years, while storms and droughts are no more frequent or severe than they have ever been, and there has been no global warming for nearly 18 years, which defies all the global warming computer models.

But everybody was on the same page of their hymnals. Renewable energy projects such as solar and wind are good for the planet and create lots of jobs, they all preached. Never was it mentioned that the renewable energy projects are not viable without taxpayer subsidies that simply kill other private sector jobs at a trade-off rate of two-to-one or that renewable energy simply costs more.

Actually, there were a couple of slips of the tongue from backsliders on the panels.

Jim Murren, chairman and CEO of MGM Resorts, which hosted the confab at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, quipped that he should achieve a return on his investment in a solar-equipped home by the time he is 172 years old.

And Paul Caudill, president of NV Energy, caused a few gasps when he cautioned that power customers cannot afford to pay 50 to 60 percent more for electricity too quickly, probably a reference to the fact solar and wind power cost three to four times as much as electricity from natural gas-fired generation.

Though the plans for a lithium-ion battery plant to be built in Storey County to produce batteries for Tesla Motor’s fossil-free electric cars was brought up repeatedly during the day as a great coup for the state of Nevada, it was never mentioned that the governor had cut a deal to allow the plant to operate nearly tax free for the next 20 years. The head of Tesla, Elon Musk, happens to be a Clinton and Obama campaign contributor.

Hillary Clinton, of course, called for still more taxpayer subsidies for her beloved green energy sources and contributors.

“We ought to be moving forward on renewables and the kind of sustainable clean energy future we seek,” she said. “Now today I don’t need to tell you that tax incentives for alternative energy investments are unpredictable at best, while generous subsidies for fossil fuels are still too easy to come by. In fact the world spends more than $500 billion subsidizing fossil fuels every year, bloating budgets and creating incentives against innovation and progress.”

While cherry picking that world subsidy number, she inconveniently neglected to point out that the U.S., according to the American Enterprise Institute, in 2010 doled out $14 billion in subsidies for renewables and $4 billion for fossil fuels. But, when broken down by actual energy produced, the subsidies for fossil fuels amounted to $68.72 per billion BTUs of energy, while renewables received $1,724 per billion BTUs.

They just don’t want to hear those inconvenient facts over in the green energy amen corner.

 

Thomas Mitchell is a longtime Nevada newspaper columnist. You may email him at thomasmnv@yahoo.com. He also blogs at http://4thst8.wordpress.com/.

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Sheriff’s investigation finds council had right to enter railroad office http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/sheriffs-investigation-finds-council-right-enter-railroad-office/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/sheriffs-investigation-finds-council-right-enter-railroad-office/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:00:44 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5607 County Commissioner first to enter building By Garrett Estrada Ely Times Staff Writer Several key details have come to light following the Ely City Council’s controversial move to enter the closed offices of the Nevada Northern Railway on Sept. 2 to gather information for a forensic audit. After completing an investigation into the matter, the […]

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County Commissioner first to enter building

By Garrett Estrada

Ely Times Staff Writer

Several key details have come to light following the Ely City Council’s controversial move to enter the closed offices of the Nevada Northern Railway on Sept. 2 to gather information for a forensic audit.

After completing an investigation into the matter, the White Pine County Sheriff’s Department said in a released statement that “the allegations of burglary and trespassing are unfounded at this time” due to the city being the owners of the historical railroad foundation after it was gifted from Kennecott Copper in 1987, which includes the office building in question.

The investigation also found further support for the city council’s entrance in the foundation’s bylaws, which were amended and approved by the city council in May of 2012.

“All books and records of the corporation may be inspected by any member, his agent or attorney, for any proper purpose at any reasonable time,” article five of the foundation’s bylaws states.

Sheriff Dan Watts also clarified his involvement the afternoon the council entered the office.

“I received a text message from Councilman (Bruce) Setterstrom saying that the council was headed down to the railroad to gather information. That was it. I never gave anyone permission and I never spoke with the mayor,” Watts said.

The investigation will now be handed over to the district attorney’s office.

White Pine County Commissioner Mike Coster also came forward to say that he was the person who climbed up the ladder to the second floor of the office building and entered through an unlocked window after moving an air conditioning unit.

Coster called The Ely Times to correct a report that had previously said Setterstrom had been the first to enter the office. Coster further clarified that his actions were that of an individual, not of a county commissioner.

“I was not there in any official capacity. I simply was the smallest person there that would fit through the window,” Coster said.

The city council’s actions drew a big reaction last week from the NNRY’s Executive Director Mark Bassett and his lawyer Scott Husbands, who both called the situation a “break-in.”

Mayor Melody Van Camp said the council was simply working with their auditor to get him the information he needed to complete the city’s forensic audit of the railroad’s finances. Van Camp said the council’s greatest concern is the debt of nearly $600,000 that the railroad has accumulated, not including another near $375,000 with their contract with S and S Shortline. Van Camp said the city should hear back from the auditor in six weeks.

Lots of readers wrote letters to the editor regarding last week’s cover story about the city council entering the railroad’s closed office. To read what people had to say, see page 5B. (Battle Born Media Staff photo)

Lots of readers wrote letters to the editor regarding last week’s cover story about the city council entering the railroad’s closed office. To read what people had to say, see page 5B. (Battle Born Media Staff photo)

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Salon owner values relationships with clients http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/salon-owner-values-relationships-clients/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/salon-owner-values-relationships-clients/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:00:33 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5627 Lori Hunt has had her hands in peoples’ hair for more than 30 years now. Working with her husband, Kim Hunt, at Stylized Hair Designs Plus, Hunt said that running her own business is “a lot more work than most people think.” But she keeps doing it. To her, her clientele has become like family. […]

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Lori Hunt used to operate a salon out of her house in McGill before opening Stylized Hair Designs Plus in 1987. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Lori Hunt used to operate a salon out of her house in McGill before opening Stylized Hair Designs Plus in 1987. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Lori Hunt has had her hands in peoples’ hair for more than 30 years now. Working with her husband, Kim Hunt, at Stylized Hair Designs Plus, Hunt said that running her own business is “a lot more work than most people think.” But she keeps doing it.

To her, her clientele has become like family.

“The best thing about this job is the relationships that you build with customers and then their kids and their kids,” Hunt said. “Some of the people that I take care of have their kids graduating from high school now and we laugh about that. It’s conversations like how I did both the mom and the daughter’s hair for the prom now.”

After running a salon out of her house in McGill for six years, Hunt decided she wanted more space and more modern equipment. In a twist of fate, her husband was laid off around the same time. Instead of letting the bad news get them down, Lori convinced her husband to go to cosmetology school. When he finished, the two opened their own salon in 1987.

Hunt said the size of her salon has slowly decreased as she gets older to keep things manageable.

“It was quite a bit bigger when we first opened,” Hunt said. “Back then we had about seven stations and lots of people, but I’ve gone down to just he and I.”

The salon itself features a nearly full service menu of options, doing hair coloring, perms, haircuts and gel fingernails. The owner said the only thing they don’t offer is acrylic nails. Hunt said having just her and her husband working allows the salon to be flexible in their appointments, something that has been key to their business.

“We’ve kinda just been like the little train that could. We’ve always been available, we’ve always worked Mondays. We don’t have set hours. We come early and we stay late,” Hunt said of the her and her husbands unique schedule.

“I think that has been one of the things that has benefited us over the years because we have been pretty available and flexible. We understand that people have jobs and that we have to work around their schedules.”

Hunt said working with a spouse can be “interesting” but her and her husband make a good team. Which is good news for her clients, especially the longtime ones.

“I have ladies that I have done for 30 years,” Hunt said. “It’s been interesting over the years. Sometimes it’s good, sometimes not so much, but we’ve always found a way.”

For more information on Stylized salon or to make an appointment, call Hunt at 775-289-6223.

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Delores “Dee” Gipson http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/delores-dee-gipson/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/delores-dee-gipson/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:00:05 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5618 Former Ely resident, Delores “Dee” Gipson passed away Friday, September 5, 2014 in Decatur Alabama. Dee was born in Hayes Center, Nebraska on October 22, 1920. She lived in Deadwood, South Dakota and Gillette, Wyoming, prior to moving to Ely in the mid 1950’s. While in Ely, Dee worked at the Chamber of Commerce, Nanette’s […]

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Gipson1Former Ely resident, Delores “Dee” Gipson passed away Friday, September 5, 2014 in Decatur Alabama. Dee was born in Hayes Center, Nebraska on October 22, 1920. She lived in Deadwood, South Dakota and Gillette, Wyoming, prior to moving to Ely in the mid 1950’s.

While in Ely, Dee worked at the Chamber of Commerce, Nanette’s Dress Shop and was the first manager of the Bristlecone Convention Center.

After her husband B.R. “Hoot” Gipson passed away, Dee moved to Texas to be nearer her sons who both lived there and in recent years she moved to Decatur to be near her sister.

Dee is survived by her sons; Walt (Sally) Ellis of Bandera, Texas and Dennis (Barbara) Ellis of Payton, Colorado.  She also leaves her sister, Dorothy (Edwin) Hanes of Decatur, Alabama; 5 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren.

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Editorial: Nevada lawmakers need to finally tackle public employee pension costs http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/editorial-nevada-lawmakers-need-finally-tackle-public-employee-pension-costs/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/editorial-nevada-lawmakers-need-finally-tackle-public-employee-pension-costs/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:59:44 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5644 When the Nevada Legislature meets in the spring it’s going to have to sharpen a lot of pencils to figure out how to balance the coming biennial budget. Lawmakers must contend with growing public school enrollment, growing Medicaid enrollments, growing personnel costs and still relatively stagnant tax revenue. The Carson City newspaper recently calculated that […]

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When the Nevada Legislature meets in the spring it’s going to have to sharpen a lot of pencils to figure out how to balance the coming biennial budget.

Lawmakers must contend with growing public school enrollment, growing Medicaid enrollments, growing personnel costs and still relatively stagnant tax revenue.

The Carson City newspaper recently calculated that even if the $1 billion in temporary tax hikes — scheduled to be sunset on June 30 — are extended once again, the revenue will fall $120 million short.

But that’s not even the half of it, according to a recent report by a think tank called Truth in Accounting. You see, Nevada like most states manages to balance its current spending and current revenue by ignoring billions of dollars in obligations.

Truth in Accounting says the biggest culprit is public employee pensions. “Pension benefits are a part of employees’ compensation. Employees earn the benefits by providing services to current taxpayers. The elected officials gain political favor by promising these benefits,” the report says. “But they do not put money aside to pay them. They argue, ‘Hey if I don’t write a check for current costs. I don’t have to include it in the budget calculations.’ This is the reason many states have huge unfunded pension liabilities.”

Nevada has the 33rd worse budget shortfall among the states, failing to cover $2.7 billion of its $2.9 billion in pension liability. That amounts to financial burden of $3,100 per taxpayer.

“Nevada statutes require the legislature to pass a balanced budget. One of the reasons Nevada is in this precarious financial position is state officials use antiquated budgeting and accounting rules to report Nevada’s financial condition. Since employee retirement benefits are not immediately payable in cash, the related compensation costs have been ignored when calculating balanced budgets,” Truth in Accounting explains.

One way for lawmakers to begin to whittle down is huge unfunded obligation is to change its pension system from a defined-benefit plan, in which retirees get a percentage of their final salaries, to a defined-contribution plan, in which the state and the employees contribute money into a 401(k)-style fund.

In the 2013 Legislature, Republican Reno Assemblyman Randy Kirner introduced a bill to begin the transition to such a pension system. Assembly Bill 342 died without a whimper in the Assembly Ways and Means Committee, axed by the Democratic committee chairwoman.

Kirner’s bill would have created a hybrid retirement program for new employees hired after July 1, 2014. It would have been a half defined-benefit and half defined-contribution plan. It included a cap on annual benefits and a prohibition against workers buying years of service credit. This little scam allows some public employees to work for 25 years, purchase five years of service credits, and retire at the age of 45 with 75 percent of their top pay adjusted for inflation for life.

According to a study for the American Enterprise Institute by resident scholar Andrew Biggs, Nevada’s public pensions are the richest in the nation — $64,000 a year or more than $1.3 million in lifetime benefits. That doesn’t include public-safety workers, such firefighters and police, who can retire earlier and generally have higher salaries.

In fact Biggs has calculated a debt even higher that Truth in Accounting. He says that by using economist-preferred fair-market evaluations the annual contributions to cover costs and amortization of pensions would be $5.8 billion. The state’s annual general fund budget is only $3.3 billion.

Such a plan as Kirner put forward would only slow the financial bleeding, not stop it, but it would be better than nothing.

The state’s lawmakers need to get serious about balancing the state’s finances instead of cowing to public employee unions. — TM

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Tonia T. Harvey http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/tonia-t-harvey/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/tonia-t-harvey/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:59:29 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5621 Tonia T. Harvey passed away quietly on August 4, 2014.  She was born to Florence and Wallace Tanner on October 19, 1938 in Los Angeles, California.  She and her sister Virginia spent most of their younger years in Salt Lake City and Los Angeles.  Tonia earned her bachelor’s degree at UCLA in 1960 in Sociology.  […]

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Tonia T. Harvey passed away quietly on August 4, 2014.  She was born to Florence and Wallace Tanner on October 19, 1938 in Los Angeles, California.  She and her sister Virginia spent most of their younger years in Salt Lake City and Los Angeles.  Tonia earned her bachelor’s degree at UCLA in 1960 in Sociology.  She and her former husband, David Harvey, moved to San Jose to raise their three children Bruce, Heather, and Jennifer.  In 1977 she earned her Master’s Degree in Anthropology and Women’s Studies.  In 1979, Tonia and her life partner Peter Ford moved to McDermitt, Nevada, where they used their knowledge and skills to write health grants for the McDermitt Paiute Reservation.  In 1983 they moved to Baker, Nevada, and Tonia ran the Lehman Caves Gift Shop and Cafe for 20 years.  In 2011, she and Peter moved to Salt Lake City to better address her Alzheimer’s needs.

Tonia is succeeded by her sister, Virginia Golder (husband George).  She is also succeeded by her children: Bruce (wife Trish and daughter Corina), Heather Lyn (husband John), and Jennifer (husband Mark), as well as her step-children: Heather Ann (husband David and children Kelsey, Cody, and Madeline), Chris ( wife Mari), William (wife Sno and children Shane and Chance), Charris (wife Dulcie and children Kashius and Phoenix), and Shandaken (wife Julia and children Shandaken, Skylar, and Bryce).

She was pre-deceased by her loving husband, Peter Ford.

Tonia and Peter laughed, loved, and lived together under the shadow of Mt. Wheeler and the Snake Creek Range.  They will be forever remembered in those mountains by us all.

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Recall filed for entire city council http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/recall-filed-entire-city-council/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/recall-filed-entire-city-council/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:59:22 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5610 A notice of intent was filed with the Deputy City Clerk on Sept. 8 to circulate a petition to recall all five sitting members of the city council. The notice, which requires three signatures, was filed by Ely residents Rick Stork, Don Purinton and Chris Lani. “The way they are operating the city right now, […]

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Rick Stork hands over a notice of intent otherwise known as a Recall Petition to Deputy City Clerk Jennifer Lee on Sept. 8. (Courtesy photo)

Rick Stork hands over a notice of intent otherwise known as a Recall Petition to Deputy City Clerk Jennifer Lee on Sept. 8. (Courtesy photo)

A notice of intent was filed with the Deputy City Clerk on Sept. 8 to circulate a petition to recall all five sitting members of the city council. The notice, which requires three signatures, was filed by Ely residents Rick Stork, Don Purinton and Chris Lani.

“The way they are operating the city right now, we’ll be lucky if there is any city left in a few years,” Stork said.

According to the Nevada Secretary of State 2013-2014 Recall Guide, filing the notice of intent for the recall petition is just the first of five steps required by the state to remove a public official. The next is to get the required number of signatures on the petition.

“The petition must contain the signatures of not less than 25 percent of the number of persons who actually voted in the state, county, district or municipality, which the public officer represents, at the election in which he/she was elected,” the Nevada Secretary of State’s Recall guide states.

“We are going to need a minimum of 198 signatures for Marty Westland and Dale Derbidge and we are going to need 215 for Bruce Setterstrom, Randy Lee and Sam Hansen,” Stork said. “The way the public is hot right now, I don’t anticipate we’ll have any trouble whatsoever in getting that number of people to sign.”

The guide also stipulates that the signatures must be signed in ink.

If successful, the petition will be given back to the deputy city clerk, who will then pass the document over to the county clerk for the third step in the recall process, “signature verification.”

To verify the signatures, the clerk first takes a “raw count” of the total signatures required to make sure that enough people signed. If so, the clerk will have to verify each signature and then submit a “certificate of results” to the Secretary of State.

At that stage, separate petitions will have to be signed again by 25 percent of the voters from the last city election to nominate candidates to run against the current city council members in a recall election. According to the recall guide, anyone can be nominated as a candidate, provided that they acquire the required amount of signatures.

The five current members of the city council who are listed on the recall petition are: Sam Hansen, Marty Westland, Randy Lee, Dale Derbidge and Bruce Setterstrom. Stork said he will put in another notice of intent for another recall petition against Mayor Melody Van Camp once the required six months has passed since she was appointed on March 14.

For more information about the petition or to sign, call Stork at 775-296-2702.

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Build a burger opens http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/build-burger-opens/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/build-burger-opens/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:59:07 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5630 Build A Burger managers Wyatt Mowray and Tammy Southall pose next to the burger grill in the kitchen. Build A Burger replaces Arby’s inside the Conoco Gas Station on Great Basin Highway. For more information on Build A Burger, call 775-289-9110. (Garrett Estrada photo)

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Build A Burger managers Wyatt Mowray and Tammy Southall pose next to the burger grill in the kitchen. Build A Burger replaces Arby’s inside the Conoco Gas Station on Great Basin Highway. For more information on Build A Burger, call 775-289-9110. (Garrett Estrada photo)Build a burger1

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This Is You – The Standard Transmission http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/standard-transmission/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/standard-transmission/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:58:52 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5633 Driver’s Education.  Words that would make the heart of a 15 year old jump with joy and fear at the same time.  That is when it was offered in school.  Now, I must admit, since Drivers Ed. is no longer a course in many schools, I do not know how youngsters learn to drive.  Parents […]

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Driver’s Education.  Words that would make the heart of a 15 year old jump with joy and fear at the same time.  That is when it was offered in school.  Now, I must admit, since Drivers Ed. is no longer a course in many schools, I do not know how youngsters learn to drive.  Parents are of course the first line of teaching.  I can just see parents, huddled around a kitchen table, in the middle of the night. It is dark and quiet and a little chilly.  She has hold of the kitchen corn broom, stems up and handle down. He has pulled out two pieces of the straw and holds them, exposed ends equal in height, tight fisted in his hand.  “Agreed,” he says, “short stick loses.”  She pulls one out and hides her choice until he reveals his.  They compare and immediately he yips and she whimpers.  She has pulled the short straw.  She will be the driving teacher of their teen-aged child who will be turning 15 and a half in two days and will then be getting the drivers permit and will need to be taught the ins and outs of driving.  That is just as soon as the written test is passed.

The written test?  Yes, the written test. I had the grand opportunity a long time ago to take up number 85 at the DVM just as number 42 was called up.  I sat and began my wait and took in all the goings on around me.  I must admit that the most fun was watching the kids being given their written tests and scooted to the roped off area to take the test in solitude.  Well as much solitude they could get in a room full of number holders.  Few of us were patient while others without thought of these test takers, felt it important to complain-loudly… What does complaining and uttering disgruntled remarks get them?  Does the line move faster? Don’t get me started. Moving ahead…

The written test is mostly common sense but it is a rite of passage. I still remember taking it some 40 plus years ago. Most importantly I remember the two questions I missed.  One about which way to turn the wheels when parking on a hill and one about what a yellow triangle shaped sign stands for.  Fifty-fifty was the chance on the wheels, I guessed wrong.  The sign, which I said was yield in reality was caution.  I still to this day say yield means caution.  But the instructor, a Mr. Pearce, wouldn’t budge.  I got my learner’s permit anyway and to my mother’s chagrin was on my way to becoming a driver.  “Hide the women and children,” was what my dad said!

The dirt road going out to Lackawanna was my proving ground.  Now it is a major paved road that leads to the Nevada State prison near Ely.  Is there a connection there? To mom’s credit, or maybe it was the Prozac, she was calm, cool and patient.  I learned in the family’s’ T-bird. Automatic transmission. Electric everything, even wing windows. I had taken Drivers Ed. so I knew the basics but needed a bit of real road work. The six months between 15 and a half and 16, when in Nevada you can get a duly certified driver’s license, went pretty quickly. Soon, heart pounding in my throat, I was taking my actual drive driving test with that same DMV agent in the passenger seat. Off in the T-bird we went.  Soon, back at the little white building that housed the DMV, I parked and turned the wheels, the wrong way again. We exited the car and with his stern face he said I had passed. My picture taken and the laminating done I was finally issued my license.

The jest of this story?  That night with new license in hand I set off to drive my friends up and down main street and cause havoc and commotion within the community. But, and this is a big but, I had to take the family’s old 1966 Plymouth Barracuda, a fine red car—with a standard transmission. Three speed on the column; no problem.  Yea, right.  I knew in my mind how it worked.  But getting it to work was the problem.  A car full of giggling 16 year old girls driving around most of the night in first gear, slowing as much as possible at each red light praying it would turn green before we got there so that darn clutch was not needed—again.  I’m pretty sure on a quiet summer night in that small Eastern Nevada town they can still hear that poor 6 cylinder engine being revved up in first gear, the chunk-a-chug, chunk-a-chug of the standard transmission being pushed to its limits.

Thanks to my brother, I now know what the friction point on a standard tranny is.  Do You?

Trina Machacek lives in Eureka.  Her book ITY BITS can be found on Kindle.  Share your thoughts and comments with her at itybytrina@yahoo.com.

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Jerald Ross Vanlaningham http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/jerald-ross-vanlaningham-2/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/12/jerald-ross-vanlaningham-2/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:58:23 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5623 09/21/1939  –  08/10/2014 Jerry passed away peacefully at the Veterans Memorial Hospital after an extraordinary 10 year fight against cancer. Jerry was born  to Ira and Ruth Vanlanningham, and raised in Ely, NV and spent four years in the Air Force. He was a professional photographer owning Truckee Meadows Photography for 28 years. Later Jerry […]

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09/21/1939  –  08/10/2014

Jerry passed away peacefully at the Veterans Memorial Hospital after an extraordinary 10 year fight against cancer. Jerry was born  to Ira and Ruth Vanlanningham, and raised in Ely, NV and spent four years in the Air Force. He was a professional photographer owning Truckee Meadows Photography for 28 years. Later Jerry and his wife owned an antique business for 25 years. Jerry was very active with Sheep Dip for 42 years and honored as a “Doctor” of Sheep Dip.

Jerry is survived by his wife, Marita, and 2 step children, Debbie “Sam” Smith and Greg Smith.

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