The Ely Times http://www.elynews.com News for Ely, Nevada Fri, 26 Sep 2014 18:09:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 17th Amendment has left states powerless against popularly elected Congress — repeal it http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/17th-amendment-left-states-powerless-popularly-elected-congress-repeal/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/17th-amendment-left-states-powerless-popularly-elected-congress-repeal/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:00:46 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5807 We managed to repeal the 18th Amendment, which created Prohibition. It is time to repeal the 17th. What? You have no idea what the 17th Amendment is? Well, it is the one that effectively ended federalism by taking the power to appoint U.S. senators from state legislatures and having the citizens directly elect them, as […]

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We managed to repeal the 18th Amendment, which created Prohibition. It is time to repeal the 17th.

What? You have no idea what the 17th Amendment is? Well, it is the one that effectively ended federalism by taking the power to appoint U.S. senators from state legislatures and having the citizens directly elect them, as they had always done with the House of Representatives.

We may not get better senators, but it is likely they would not try dictating to the states what they should do — as they did when they set the national speed limit at 55 mph and the drinking age at 21, under threat of losing highway funding. No Child Left Behind dictates education standards under threat of losing funding. The Motor Voter Law told states how to register voters.

ObamaCare threatened federal funding if states did not expand Medicaid and set up exchanges, until the Supreme Court decided that was too onerous.

James Madison said during debate over the Bill of Rights, “The state legislatures will jealously and closely watch the operations of Government, and be able to resist with more effect every assumption of power, than any other power on earth can do; and the greatest opponents to a Federal government admit the State Legislatures to be sure guardians of people’s liberty.”

There was a grand design to balance power, but that was broken in 1913 with the passage of the 17th Amendment.

George Mason warned when the Constitution was being drafted in Philadelphia that the Senate had to represent the states lest the federal government “swallow up the state legislatures.”

Mason argued to the delegation, “(W)e have agreed that the national Legislature shall have a negative on the State Legislatures — the Danger is that the national, will swallow up the State Legislatures — what will be a reasonable guard agt. this Danger, and operate in favor of the State authorities — The answer seems to me to be this, let the State Legislatures appoint the Senate …”  The delegates backed him unanimously.

Justice Antonin Scalia in 2010 at Texas Tech University Law School was asked what he would change about the Constitution.

“There’s very little that I would change,” he said. “I would change it back to what they wrote, in some respects. The 17th Amendment has changed things enormously.”

Scalia added, “We changed that in a burst of progressivism in 1913, and you can trace the decline of so-called states’ rights throughout the rest of the 20th century. So, don’t mess with the Constitution.”

That’s how we got FDR’s New Deal.

Then there is the argument put forward by Nevada’s own Jay Bybee, former William Boyd Law School constitutional law professor at UNLV and now judge on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the recommendation of Nevada’s senior senator, Harry Reid.

In 1997 Bybee penned an article for the Northwestern University Law Review titled “Ulysses at the Mast: Democracy, Federalism, and the Siren’s Song.” In Greek mythology, beautiful sirens lured sailors with their music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island.

Bybee wrote of the passage of the 17th Amendment with a rhetorical flourish:

“Mason wished to provide some mechanism for states to defend themselves against ‘encroachment’ by a national government that everyone recognized would have significantly more power than any American sovereign since July 3, 1776. A senate appointed by state legislatures would be a near-complete defense to national encroachment because the senate controlled one-half of Congress. …

“The Senate’s slide to popular democracy unyoked states and the national government in a way that has left the states nearly powerless to defend their position as other legitimate representatives of the people. As the United States moved into the Twentieth Century, it was inevitable that Congress would aggressively exercise power over matters such as commerce and spending for the general welfare in ways that no constitutional prophet would have foreseen. The lack of foresight of the circumstances under which Congress would exercise its powers did not excuse our failure to maintain those constitutional structures that assure the tempered, essential use of such powers. When we loosed ourselves from the mast to answer the Sirens’ call, we unleashed consequences only Circe could have foreseen.”

If the state Legislature of Nevada appointed the state’s two senators, do you think Reid would be calling them cowards for not voting to outlaw brothels in rural counties as he demanded in a speech at the Legislature in 2011?

The audacity of such power.

 

Thomas Mitchell is a longtime Nevada newspaper columnist. You may email him at thomasmnv@yahoo.com. He also blogs at http://4thst8.wordpress.com/.

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Wild West groomer passionate about animals http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/wild-west-groomer-passionate-animals/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/wild-west-groomer-passionate-animals/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:00:45 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5781 Billy Sue Heckethorn knew she wanted to work with animals since she was a little girl, growing up on a ranch in Ely. Now her schedule is almost always full and she sees an average of 15 dogs a day at Wild West Grooming. Heckethorn, who had seven years of experience as a veterinarian technician […]

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Dustin Gledhill and Billy Sue Heckethorn pose with dogs Jake, Maizi, Oakley, Chinks, Mattee and Lil Roy. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Dustin Gledhill and Billy Sue Heckethorn pose with dogs Jake, Maizi, Oakley, Chinks, Mattee and Lil Roy. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Billy Sue Heckethorn knew she wanted to work with animals since she was a little girl, growing up on a ranch in Ely. Now her schedule is almost always full and she sees an average of 15 dogs a day at Wild West Grooming. Heckethorn, who had seven years of experience as a veterinarian technician prior, said grooming all those dogs is her passion.

“I love these dogs,” Heckthorn said.

The store’s owner talks as an older dog sits patiently on her grooming table, barely flinching during its scheduled trim. Heckethorn said she has been grooming the dog for over a decade and that the dog has grown to trust her. She describes it like being around children who can’t talk all day.

“Every dog is different. Some are easy. Some are scared. You just have to go slowly, just like you would with a kid, to gain their trust,” Heckethorn said.

Her experience and comfort level with the animals has led to many repeat customers. Since Wild West Grooming also offers doggy daycare services, Heckethorn said many of the animals get used to the store, thinking of it as a second home.

“When a dog from one of my regular customers gets away, they usually end up at my store, because that’s where they know to go,” the owner said.

Though her dream was to eventually be a veterinarian, Heckethorn said she decided to get out of the medical side of it to spend more time with her young children in 2001. Opening Wild West Grooming allowed her to continue to work with animals, while also allowing for a schedule that accommodated her family.

“If I couldn’t work with animals, I don’t know what I would do,” she said.

Her busy schedule indicates she won’t have to find out. Wild West Grooming had to turn away potential business due to being over booked last year. Though Heckethorn said things tend to calm down at the beginning of winter, she recommends making an appointment “several weeks in advance.”

“People get mad at me when I tell them we are full. They think we can’t possibly be that busy. There will be days when I see 16 dogs straight,” she said.

While business is almost exclusively limited to man’s best friend, Heckethorn’s store will still accommodate for other pets.

“I do some cats. I’ve even done rabbits, ferrets and trimmed a bird’s nails,” she said.

But above all else, Heckethorn said she enjoys helping people and their animals. She’ll try and give clients any medical advice for an animal if she noticed something  during a makeover. She also stays away from sedation.

“I never sedate any of the animals when we groom them. I don’t like it. The animals can’t remember what happened, so you don’t earn their trust,” Heckethorn said.

To make an appointment at Wild West Grooming, call 775-289-9003.

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Shortline answers questions http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/shortline-answers-questions/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/shortline-answers-questions/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:00:37 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5762 Anyone who has attended an Ely City Council meeting in recent months knows that much has been made of the rail car storage agreement between the Nevada Northern Railway and S&S Shortline. The Salt Lake City-based company entered into an a car storage lease agreement with the Nevada Northern Railway in 2009 to make improvements […]

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The Nevada Northern Railway’s lease agreement with S&S Shortline could eventually lead to more commercial businesses moving to Ely. (Battle Born Media Staff photo)

The Nevada Northern Railway’s lease agreement with S&S Shortline could eventually lead to more commercial businesses moving to Ely. (Battle Born Media Staff photo)

Anyone who has attended an Ely City Council meeting in recent months knows that much has been made of the rail car storage agreement between the Nevada Northern Railway and S&S Shortline. The Salt Lake City-based company entered into an a car storage lease agreement with the Nevada Northern Railway in 2009 to make improvements and eventually open up the lines for commerical use. The agreement only focuses on the railroad past the McGill Junction, which is not associated with the historical foundation’s section of track.

Questions about how much the city owes S&S for track repairs, whether they want to own or scrap the rail and more have been asked. Though it was eventually revealed that the city owed $374,000 to S&S after months of inquiries, some of the other questions still remain.

In an exclusive interview with The Ely Times, S&S Shortline’s Manager Mike Williams looks to clear things up and let the Ely community know why his company’s involvement in the railroad is so important.

The Ely Times: A lot of people are just learning the name S&S Shortline for the first time. Can you explain to those people who S&S is?

Williams: S&S is a company out of the Salt Lake City area, owned by Steve Flanders. They’ve been in the railroad business for a while. Steve is probably one of the biggest guys in the country that deals in locomotives, locomotive parts and rebuilding used locomotives. He is just a really nice guy that I’ve known for years, but he is more into the mechanical part of railroading than operating the railroads. That is why he hired me to come in and manage for him and try to get this thing off of the ground. That is something that my company is very successful in doing. We buy our railroads and rebuild them and bring business in. So Steve and I had known each other so he hired me to help him manage it and help him out here.

The Ely Times: Much has been made about the amount of money owed back to S&S Shortline from track repairs. It was revealed in a recent city council meeting that the total amount is $374,000. Is that the true and final total?

Williams: Yes. That is correct.

The Ely Times: The railroad’s executive director Mark Bassett has said that that amount is only expected to be paid back to S&S Shortline through money made by the railroad once it is in operation. Is that correct?

Williams: That is correct. And that is something for me that has been really disappointing. This Marty [Westland], with what he says, there is no wonder people are going to be scared. We go out and fix railroads, that just the way it is. One of the ways we do that is to work with the federal government in obtaining grants which help us rebuild the lines. I’ll tell you a short story here. I took over the same type railroad a few years ago in South Dakota. The track was in three times as bad of shape as the line in Ely. And what we’ve been able to do, and it took everyone working together, is we applied for federal grants, which is like free money that doesn’t have to be paid back, to say here is a way that we can create business. Because of that, between the state and the feds, we’ve just received our second grant which, with the first one that we got and the second one that we were getting ready to do, here was $60 million of money being granted to us to rebuild the railroad. We just turned something that looked like a field of grass into a beautiful railroad, and we did that by having everyone working together.

The Ely Times: Is that your goal then with the NNRY? To get it fully operational?

Williams: Yes it is. But with the way it is right now, you know, I took a trip out there to speak with the city council. The morning before I was scheduled to get into Ely, the city council was supposed to meet with the foundation, but the city council just pulled a boner on them and didn’t even show up to the meeting. That was kind of a slap in the face to me. I traveled 1,000 miles to come and try to get something started and instead what happened was we get the city council who just blows it off and act like they are going to jack these guys around more. It is a sickening situation what is going on there right now.

The Ely Times: In your example with the railroad in South Dakota, you said that everyone worked together. Has the Ely City Council made it difficult to work together like that?

Williams: It is very discouraging and it is making the situation impossible. I hired a consulting firm to help me go out and bring in some big business to this railroad. As you know, there is oil out your backdoor window. That oil is going to be drilled and be found. And once that happens, there will be a tremendous need for capabilities of companies to be able to be located on the railroad to transload oil and everything else. We were working with a certain company, a big energy company, right at the first of the year. And they just came back and said that they were not willing to invest any money out there. I know these people. I do business with them. If it were my railroad, they would be doing business with me. They are not going to come in and build these facilities, which cost tens of millions of dollars, because this thing is a mess out there. They are not going to come up and support the railroad. There needs to be companies brought in from all over the United States to make these shortline railroads profitable and able to operate. Very few shortline railroads are able to make their way with just local business. I own 10 shortline railroads across the country. I’ve got a really nice marketing group. What we do is basically market all those railroads out there under one holding company. So we are in touch with people from all over the United States. That is one thing that we bring to the table. I have a big, construction company. I know how to build track, I know how to buy materials. The main part about it is we have this marketing group that knows how to bring in business from out of state, it won’t just be people from Ely.

The Ely Times: What did you take away from your appearance at the city council meeting?

Williams: I’m not into any cloudy issues. I just tell it like it is. And it is like Marty saying that I don’t have the right to run the railroad. Well, hell if I don’t. The Service Transportation Board gave us the right. We are the operator at the railroad. Whether Marty likes that or not, he isn’t going to do anything to change that. You have an agreement. Here is what is so simple. You have a contract and each party is supposed to fulfill that agreement. That is all we are asking to do. We can’t fulfill anything because of what they are doing to us and we’re not going to tolerate it much longer. It is such a shame what is going on out there.

The Ely Times: So are you saying that the Ely City Council’s actions over the past 10 months are putting the deal with S&S Shortline in jeopardy?

Williams: I’ll tell you what. If it wasn’t for Steve Flanders and how I like Steve, if I were doing this someone else, I would’ve already told them that I’m not wasting my time on this. I’m not a guy that gives up easy. I know that there is potential there. We are not going to give up on this. We have all of the fundamental things to have a good railroad out here, but we are just stalemated right now. One of the other things that Marty does is get people riled up about how much money is owed. They don’t owe us anything. That money is going to be come through generating business. There is several hundred thousand dollars tied up in it right now and does that cost us money? We pay interest on that money so yes it does. We need to get it opened up so we can pay ourselves back. That won’t come from the taxpayer, that won’t come from any city budget. That money will come from revenue generated off of the railroad. So it is nothing but a win-win for the city so get this thing opened up. Generate some money and make it a fluid cash flow. It should be a positive thing for this city and right now it is just dormant.

The Ely Times: If the railroad does not become operational, is there any situation where the money owed will have to be paid back by the city?

Williams: Well the contract which was put together was pretty short. That is probably one of those things that a court has to decide instead of one person’s opinion over another. I’ll be honest with you, it never needs to get to that point. We don’t want it to get to that point. We are willing for this thing to get straightened up so we can go on about our business. I will put it this way. There are certain things that can be done. What the city doesn’t understand is that cities don’t control railroads, railroads are controlled by the Service Transportation Board in Washington D. C. If things don’t get straightened out, what will happen is, the Service Transportation Board will be asked to come out and straighten this mess out. They will do that. I know what they can and can’t do. They can come in and tell whoever is messing up the situation “you’re out of here.” That is not how this game works. The city owns the railroad, and that is great, I own a railroad, but they really have no control of what goes on there. They can make a contract, which they are supposed to live up to, and when they don’t, and it is hampering common carrier obligations to companies that need it, that is a serious situation to be in. We haven’t pulled that out yet to use it, but if things don’t get straightened out, the Service Transportation Board will have to get involved pretty shortly. I don’t want to go there. But if we have to, we will. A city council in Ely doesn’t have a damn bit of say so on what that railroad can do, that is government. We are talking federal here.

The Ely Times: Does S&S have any plans to scrap any of the rail?

Williams: When we started business, railroads were being abandoned and several thousand miles of railroad were being torn out. That was part of our business. We did do that type of work and we still do sometimes. But, what we have done in the last 15 years is that we have targeted buying railroads that, if we wouldn’t have bought them, they would’ve been scrapped. It takes people like myself to step in and say “now wait, hold on here.” I can see something and I can make something of this. We have no right to scrap any part of the railroad. What we do from time to time is take the smaller rail out and sell it to buy a bigger rail to put it in. But as far as just tearing any old rail out and scrapping it, we can’t do that. We have never had any plans to do that. We are not out to scrap the railroad, we are out to fix it and generate business.

The Ely Times: There has been concerns in the community that S&S Shortline would eventually look to own the Nevada Northern Railway. Has there ever been plans to seek out ownership of the railroad of any kind?

Williams: I’ve never had such a conversation. They do not wish to own the railroad. Maybe if the city ever wanted to sell it, then they might. If the city put it up for bid, [S&S] would probably bid on it, but there has never been a conversation about S&S Shortline owning the railroad. We don’t own the railroad, we just want to fix it up. We have no interest in making any types of moves to take over ownership of the railroad. The only thing we have an interest is in operating it.

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Ladycats come close http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/ladycats-come-close/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/ladycats-come-close/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:00:29 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5795 Turns out coaches can learn a thing or two alongside players. After White Pine’s 4-1 home loss against North Tahoe on Sept. 19, coach Tyler Laity admitted an experimental lineup was to blame for the Ladycats’ slow start. “I wanted to try something different. We had worked on it all week but it just didn’t […]

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Tainui Brewster makes a pass during White Pine’s home 4-1 home loss against North Tahoe on Sept. 19. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Tainui Brewster makes a pass during White Pine’s home 4-1 home loss against North Tahoe on Sept. 19. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Turns out coaches can learn a thing or two alongside players. After White Pine’s 4-1 home loss against North Tahoe on Sept. 19, coach Tyler Laity admitted an experimental lineup was to blame for the Ladycats’ slow start.

“I wanted to try something different. We had worked on it all week but it just didn’t work out right,” Laity said. “I think we’ll go a different way next time we play them. It was definitely a learning experience more me.”

The coach said he and his team might have given a little too much credit to the Lakers, who are consistently among the best teams in the conference. The overreaction caused the team to play out of sync. Once the Ladycats finally found their groove, the game was already out of reach. White Pine scored its only goal with five minutes remaining in the match.

“We went back to our normal formation in the second half, which ended up giving us more success on offense. Knowing that now, I think if we played them again, it would be a much different, much closer game,” Laity said.

The Ladycats’ second home game of the weekend, against Incline on Sept. 20, proved to be a much closer affair, with the Highlanders edging the Ladycats 5-4 in a much better offensive performance by White Pine’s four-person front. The offensive output was White Pine’s largest ever against Incline according to the coach.

“We are really bummed that we lost both games, we thought we could at least get a tie out of one of those matchups. But at the same time, I’m happy to see that we can play competitively with the lake schools. It didn’t seem like they were that much better than us,” Laity said.

The coach said that overall the team played “really well” in their Saturday game and thanked the support of the home crowd for keeping the team energized. Laity gave credit to Lucy Fullmer for helping generate much of the Ladycats’ offense in the two losses.

“She played so well on Saturday and was a part of all four goals that we scored in the Incline game,” Laity said. Fullmer finished the game against Incline with two goals and two assists. She also scored White Pine’s only goal against North Tahoe.

The Ladycats will go back on the road this weekend, traveling to Pershing County High School on Sept. 26 to take on the Mustangs at 4 p.m. The Ladycats will then travel to Battle Mountain to play the Longhorns on Sept. 27 at 1 p.m.

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Plush to hold workshop Sept. 26 http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/plush-hold-workshop-sept-26/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/plush-hold-workshop-sept-26/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:00:22 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5791 Plush Gift Shop, located on in downtown Ely, will hold a workshop on how to make a paper garland on Sept. 26 at 6 p.m. The cost for the workshop is $16.16. Supplies are included in the price.

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Plush Gift Shop, located on in downtown Ely, will hold a workshop on how to make a paper garland on Sept. 26 at 6 p.m. The cost for the workshop is $16.16. Supplies are included in the price.

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Christopher “Chris” David Hall http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/christopher-chris-david-hall/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/christopher-chris-david-hall/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:00:09 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5770 Christopher “Chris” David Hall, born in Las Vegas on Oct. 7, 1969, suddenly passed away in his home in Ely, on Sept. 16, 2014. Chris is survived by his loving family; wife Shirley, mother Kathy, sister Cindi, brothers John (wife Julie), Steve (wife Petty), and his devoted pets; Marley, Buddy, Bella, Nibbles, Mia, Emmie. Plus […]

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Chris Hall1Christopher “Chris” David Hall, born in Las Vegas on Oct. 7, 1969, suddenly passed away in his home in Ely, on Sept. 16, 2014.

Chris is survived by his loving family; wife Shirley, mother Kathy, sister Cindi, brothers John (wife Julie), Steve (wife Petty), and his devoted pets; Marley, Buddy, Bella, Nibbles, Mia, Emmie. Plus his cherished extended family and numerous friends.

Chris was the very proud son of WWII veteran and educator Donald Jordan Hall and grandson of WWI flying ace and member of France’s LaFayette Escadrille, Bert Hall.

A graduate of Ed W. Clark High School, Chris was honored to serve his country in the United State Navy where he also met his wife of 20 years, Shirley. For over 16 years Chris also proudly served as a Senior Corrections Officer at the Ely State prison where he excelled in his job and was respected by his fellow officers.

He loved to go fishing and enjoyed taking care of his many pets.

Chris was a loving and devoted husband, son, brother and friend who will be greatly missed by so many.

Services are to be held Thursday, Sept. 25 at 10:00 a.m. at the Veteran’s Memorial Cemetery in Boulder City, NV.

A Celebration of Life service will be schedule in Ely at a later date for all of his beloved Ely family and friends.

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Japanese press travel to Ely for race http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/japanese-press-travel-ely-race/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/japanese-press-travel-ely-race/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:59:49 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5765 Amid the parade of Corvettes, Mustangs and other sports cars, one vehicle stood out like a sore thumb at the Silver State Classic Challenge’s car show down Aultman Street on Friday. A minivan, adorned with a Japanese flag on its side, garnered just as many cheer as any of the souped-up muscle cars. While it […]

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Amid the parade of Corvettes, Mustangs and other sports cars, one vehicle stood out like a sore thumb at the Silver State Classic Challenge’s car show down Aultman Street on Friday.

A minivan, adorned with a Japanese flag on its side, garnered just as many cheer as any of the souped-up muscle cars. While it wasn’t a part of the race, its driver and passengers have become an established staple of the September race.

“This is my eighth year coming to Ely. I love coming here because the people are so nice, they welcome me and my team back each year with open arms,” Kazuhiko Kono said.

Working with a crew of three other photographers and videographers, Kono and his team made the trek to Ely all the way from their hometown in Yokohama, Japan, to try and capture the sights and sounds of the muscle cars on display as part of the open road race. Their pictures and footage will eventually make it back to Yokohama to be featured in a popular Japanese car magazine called Supercar. As Kono explains, Japanese audiences find the very nature of an “open road” race to be fascinating, which is why he has kept coming back year after year.

“Yokohama, like other Japanese cities, is a very cramped and populated area. It is such a contrast from the vast open spaces of Northern Nevada, and I think that scenic backdrop, mixed with the fast cars, makes for some compelling content for our readers and viewers online,” Kono said.

While Kono came to see cars that “just can’t be seen anywhere in Japan,” his crew was taking in the crisp mountain air and small town culture that Ely has to offer for their very first time. Supercar camera operator Majamitsu Maeda said the entire experience was “amazing.”

“The air is very different here. The drive just from Las Vegas to Ely is amazing to look at because there is so much open space all around for miles,” Maeda said.

The group’s trip consists of a 14-hour flight from Japan to Los Angeles, another flight from Los Angeles to Las Vegas and a four-hour road trip from Sin City to Ely. After spending three days in Ely covering the race, the group will get some extra time in the United States with a week of vacation time split between Las Vegas and Los Angeles before heading back home.

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Editorial: Put up or shut up http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/editorial-put-shut/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/editorial-put-shut/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:59:37 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5809 It’s time for the Ely City Council to come clean. The city created a mess by its actions against the non-profit Nevada Northern Railway. It must now plainly tell the people why. Let’s break down current events involving the city and railroad. First, the council unanimously voted to remove the chair and the vice-chair of […]

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It’s time for the Ely City Council to come clean.

The city created a mess by its actions against the non-profit Nevada Northern Railway. It must now plainly tell the people why.

Let’s break down current events involving the city and railroad.

First, the council unanimously voted to remove the chair and the vice-chair of the railroad’s board, saying that the two were doing a stellar job.

We then playfully asked what happens to citizen volunteers who do a perfect job — public execution?

The mayor wrote the newspaper in a surprisingly unprofessional way to criticize our assessment, saying that the councilman who praised the board members (he later voted to fire) was only one person on the City Council and not everyone shared his praise of the railroad board.

We understand that, Madam Mayor. You make our point for us — the mayor and the city council are not being honest here. If the city thinks fraud or mismanagement of the railroad has occurred, then man-up and make the case. Don’t say nothing during the meeting then go level cheap-shot accusations.

Second, following that duplicitous episode, for which the mayor and the city council received much criticism, the mayor and two councilmen showed up at the railroad office on a day they knew it was closed and demanded to be let in so an accountant from Las Vegas could audit the books. The manager of the railroad was on vacation. When an employee of the railroad told them to come back when the railroad office was open, the trio broke in the office.

We’re not making this up.

They removed a second-story window air conditioning unit, entered the office, and downloaded files from the railroad’s computers.

We don’t care who you are or what you might think of this issue between the city and the railroad, that’s irresponsible in the extreme on the part of the mayor and the council.

To compound the bad judgment, they then lied to the newspaper by saying the sheriff gave them permission to break in. The sheriff has publicly said he did nothing of the sort.

Today The Ely Times publishes a Q&A with the manager of the S&S Shortline. The relationship between S&S and the railroad is apparently a key issue in the dispute. We invite the mayor and members of the City Council to read it.

We’re open, as our readers are, to trying to better understand exactly what is the burr under the saddle of the city in regards to the railroad. And we again ask the mayor and the city council to stop playing games; stop saying one thing and doing another; and for goodness sake stop burglarizing office buildings and tell the people plainly what is your beef?

In other words, and we mean this in a most respectful way, put up, or shut up.

— SF

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Local artist to host first show http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/local-artist-host-first-show/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/local-artist-host-first-show/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:59:32 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5784 Katherine Rountree knew for years that she wanted to be an artist. She discovered her passion for painting while attending the University of Utah, working on a Bachelor’s Degree for graphic design. After graduating, she painted on the side while working full-time as a graphic designer. It worked because she couldn’t support herself on her […]

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Katherine Rountree shows off some of the paintings from her collection that will be on display at the Art Bank starting Oct. 3. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Katherine Rountree shows off some of the paintings from her collection that will be on display at the Art Bank starting Oct. 3. (Garrett Estrada photo)

Katherine Rountree knew for years that she wanted to be an artist. She discovered her passion for painting while attending the University of Utah, working on a Bachelor’s Degree for graphic design. After graduating, she painted on the side while working full-time as a graphic designer. It worked because she couldn’t support herself on her art alone.

Not yet at least.

“I wouldn’t call it a hobby back then. I knew that I wanted to do it. I just wasn’t able to yet,” Rountree said.

The Ely native will finally get her chance as a real, professional artist on Oct. 3 when her collection of paintings will be displayed in the Art Bank. The mixture of private collection pieces and art for sale, around 20 in total, represent five years of diligent work on Rountree’s behalf, and the opening will mark her very first show.

“I’m really excited,” she said. “It’s just going to be a lot of fun. I hope people come and just enjoy it. I hope they like it of course.”

Rountree had sold her art before, in a gift shop in Baker, but October’s opening will finally accomplish her dream of becoming an artist. Though she works with various mediums, from pencil to water colors and oils, Rountree said she mostly enjoys painting portraits. Through the use of what she calls “atmospheric effects” and different uses of lighting, the artist said she hopes the thing that most people take away from her collection is a sense of “wow.”

“I would just try to capture what it was like to see something and say ‘wow,’” Rountree said.

The artist said a painting can sometimes “paint itself” taking almost no time to finish, but other times pieces can take upwards of two weeks. Not that she minds the extra time, now that she is retired, Rountree finally feels like she has the creative freedom and financial security to take her time on each piece.

“After I retired, I told myself I have to get this done before I don’t have anymore time,” Rountree said.

The opening of the Art Bank in Ely was the final straw in Rountree’s inspiration to paint. According to her, just having a space to display local artist’s work can make a huge difference in the art that can be produced in a community.

“Before, you either had to go out of state or to a big city to show your art, and that just didn’t work,” Rountree said. “There has never before been an opportunity for local artists like the art bank, so I’m really, really happy to have a place like the art bank to have an opportunity to show the work that I do and see how it goes.”

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Patricia Leone McCarty http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/patricia-leone-mccarty/ http://www.elynews.com/2014/09/26/patricia-leone-mccarty/#respond Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:59:29 +0000 http://www.elynews.com/?p=5773 Patricia Leone McCarty of Ruth, Nevada, passed away at the age of 84, in her home on September 20, 2014.  Patricia was born to Harley and Alice Eckert on May 12, 1930 in Flagler, Colorado. Patricia enjoyed working on her home; remodeling and repairing, as well as gardening, painting and genealogy work. Patricia married M.L. […]

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Patricia McCarty1Patricia Leone McCarty of Ruth, Nevada, passed away at the age of 84, in her home on September 20, 2014.  Patricia was born to Harley and Alice Eckert on May 12, 1930 in Flagler, Colorado. Patricia enjoyed working on her home; remodeling and repairing, as well as gardening, painting and genealogy work.

Patricia married M.L. McCarty on November, 23, 1948 in New Mexico. Patricia is survived by her loving husband “Mac”, her daughters; Martha (Jim) Rice of West Jordan, UT, Patsy (Leo) Behnke of Las Vegas, NV, Maxine (Dave) Lantz of Ruth, NV, Three Grandchildren; Jeff (Chrissy) Rice, Jerry (Liz) Rice, Jody (Torry) Rice, eight Great Grandchildren, one Great Great Grandchild, three sisters; Margaret, Maxine, and Linda all of Colorado, and several nieces and nephews.

Services were held at Mountain Vista Chapel on September 25, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. with an Interment following at the Ely City Cemetery.

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